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ASA Summer Programs - Business, Health Disciplines, Computers, Criminal Justice, Arts and Sciences
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DISTANCE LEARNING

SPRING 2014 ONLINE COURSE LIST

ASA offers more than 30 courses in the Distance Learning format, as part of the college's commitment in providing quality education and extensive student support. Take a course anytime, anywhere --at your convenience!

Distance Learning Faculty are qualified professionals and academics who share their knowledge and practical experience to enhance learning and understanding through the latest and most comprehensive pedagogical methodologies.

You can use the table below to view and learn more about the list of offered Distance Learning courses. To register, please visit the Registrar's Office.

** PLEASE NOTE FEBRUARY 21, 2014 is the last day for Spring semester registrations.


Division of Health Disciplines

ALH 110 - Medical Office Administration

This course covers the responsibilities encountered by medical office personnel. Topics include an introduction to basic medical office skills including telephone techniques, filing and indexing, mail handling, appointment scheduling, travel arrangements, correspondence, and business transactions. Emphasis is placed on human relations and customer relations.


ALH160 - Law and Ethics for Allied Health Professionals

This course covers the history of healthcare; the skills, attitude, and role of the medical assistant in the health care setting; job opportunities and licensure requirement; and the role of ethics and legal issues in the field of health care. Emphasis is placed on professionalism, legal relationships of physicians and patients, professional liability, medical ethics, and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).


BIO110 - Microbiology

This course provides knowledge of pathogenic microorganisms. Students are first introduced to the basic biological processes of viruses and bacteria as are required for their viability. Then, the strategies that microbial pathogens employ to successfully infect humans and cause disease are described.


LAW115 - Legal and Ethical Issues for Pharmacy Technician

This course presents the material dealing with pharmacy laws, regulations and ethics aimed specifically at the pharmacy technician. Students will learn the many laws and regulations that pharmacy technicians must understand in order to practice in a legal and ethical manner. Students will be presented with an overview of the United States' legal system and review the development of current laws and the major laws affecting present-day pharmacy practice. Drug control laws and ethical issues most applicable to the pharmacy technician will also be covered.


MED 205 - Pharmacology

The course is a basic introduction to the principles of pharmacology. Topics include classes of drugs by body systems as well as antivirals, antibiotics, vaccines and immunizations, and chemotherapy agents. Basic drug concepts and nomenclature required in the allied health professions such as preparations and route of administration, dose calculations, side effects, and abbreviations will be stressed.


PSY115 - Psycho- social Aspects of Health Care

This course presents basic psychological concepts appropriate for the health care worker. Subjects discussed include effective communication, diversity of clients served by the health care system, effects of stress, physical and emotional needs in different life stages and as affected by illness, emotional responses to various life experiences, and specific emotions as they affect behavior.


Division of Business

BUS120 - Organizational Behavior

This course provides a basic understanding of human actions in organizations. It includes the analysis of individual and group processes in organizational settings. It also helps the student to understand, predict, and improve the performance of individuals and the organizations in which they work.


BUS150 - Principles of Microeconomics

Microeconomics is a survey course with the core focus of exposing students to how the factors of production are allocated about and within households, firms and industries. The scope of this course's contents includes discussions about the fundamentals of supply and demand as competing ends for the consumption of goods and services in the economy. The consumer theory is discussed as a vital part of the course. Production, particularly under a revenue-cost consideration, is discussed in the context of the impacts of perfection competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly. Coverage is given to factor prices in relation to income sources and monopsony in the labor market.


BUS175 - Business Law

This course introduces students to the principles of Business Law. Business Ethics and Social Responsibility, Torts, Intellectual Property, Cyber Law, Criminal Law and Contracts are a few of the topics to be covered.


BUS200 - Principles of Marketing

This course introduces the student to the role of marketing in the economy, and covers major marketing topics including institutions involved in the marketing process (manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers, advertising agencies, marketing research firms, banks, shippers, storage warehouses, and others). The course also examines major tools used by modern marketers (product, price, promotion, place and major environmental forces affecting the marketing process), demographics, economics, ecology, technology, politics and culture. Prerequisite: BUS110


BUS205 - Principles of Finance

This course approaches the three traditional divisions of finance (corporate finance, investments, and financial institutions) by employing the twin concepts of value maximization and the risk/expected return tradeoff throughout the course. It distinguishes between finance and economics, focuses on time value of money concepts, provides a basic overview of the operations of the firm against the background of financial intermediation and the capital markets, explores security valuation and capital market theory, capital budgeting and corporate financing, financial derivatives and risk management, international financial management, financial analysis and financial planning, inventory and cash management, accounts receivable management.


BUS215 - Business Management

This course provides a basic understanding of management within the business environment. The course relies heavily upon the classical approach to management, centering on the four basic functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Included within this perspective are problem solving, the use of specialized techniques (PERT, NGT, JIT, etc), job design, work teams, and human resources management and the leader's role both as a motivator and communicator. Finally, the course deals with the importance of self-management within the framework of the organization.


BUS230 - Personnel Management

This course provides a brief introduction to human resources management. The students examine employer-employee relations in such areas as equal employment opportunity practices, training and appraisal methods, compensation, management and reward of motivational programs. This application oriented course equips students with the skills and knowledge necessary for the workplace.


BUS240 - Introduction to Ecommerce

Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to apply the new technologies, particularity Internet and Web technologies to help individuals, businesses, and other organizations conduct business better. They will be able to know how some businesses, by using electronic commerce have been able to create new products and services, and others improve their promotions, marketing, and delivery of existing products. They will also learn how firms have found many ways to use electronic commerce to improve purchasing and supply activities, identify new customers, and operate their finance, administration, and manage human resources more efficiently. Prerequisites: CIS100, BUS11


OFT240 - Records Management

This course introduces the student to the complex field of records management. The student will be able to understand the Alphabetic filing rules compatible with the Association of Records Management (ARMA) guidelines. Along with other topics, student will learn the methods of storing and retrieving alphabetic, subject, numeric and geographic records.


Division of Criminal Justice

CRJ120 - Criminal Law & Procedures

This course is organized according to the central theme of balancing conflicting interests. The law of criminal procedure balances the interest in obtaining the correct result in particular cases against the interest in upholding a fair process in all cases. In this course, the ends are the correct result in the case at hand; the means is the process by which the result is obtained. This course recognizes the importance of obtaining the correct result-namely, the ends of both freeing the innocent and convicting the guilty. It also promotes the value of enforcing the law according to fair procedures.


CRJ150 - Introduction to Corrections

This course is an overview of the field of corrections. It deals with how corrections in the United States function. The course touches on areas like jails, prisons, inmates, probation and parole, and community-based corrections. In addition, the course discusses the administration portion of the corrections, the correctional work world and careers, and inmates' rights and litigation.


CRJ200 - Current Issues in Criminal Justice

This course provides students with an overview of current issues in the administration of criminal justice. "Administration" encompasses criminal justice policies implemented by the police, courts, and correctional agencies (i.e., jails, prisons, and parole/probation departments). Time permitting; the course will also focus attention on some of the law enforcement agencies that have come to the forefront of the public eye since the September 11th terrorist attacks - namely the FBI and CIA. Finally, the course focuses on the intended and unintended consequences of policies implemented by these entities, as well as debates, controversies, and trends in the administration of criminal justice. This course may not be taken before the second semester.


CRJ210 - Diversity and Criminal Justice

This course critically examines race, gender, and other diversity issues within the U.S. criminal justice system. The topic of emphasis is the importance of diversity issues in the development, organization and operation of the criminal justice system.


CRJ215 - Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice

This course discusses the ethical issues such as capital punishment and official corruption. Deadly force, discretion and deception by practitioners are critically examined. Identification and analysis of ethical issues in the field of criminal justice are discussed in detail with specific references to current events. This course may not be taken before the second semester.


SOC150 - Child Welfare/Child Abuse Prevention

This course will examine the child welfare system and its historical development. Students will gain an understanding of the basic child welfare policies, programs and practices related to child and family functioning. A survey of supplement, supportive and substitute services is provided. Students will also understand the different roles of the child welfare social worker. The issues of poverty, oppression, race and ethnicity, and their impact on children and families will also be explored.


LIB150 - Research Methods in Criminal Justice

This course is an introductory course in research methods in Criminal Justice. It is designed to introduce the student to basic concepts and problems encountered in criminal justice investigation, including types of data and measurement, sampling, probability, and research design. This course will emphasize the importance and limitations of theory and methodology in criminal justice research as well as purposes of applied research, program evaluation, policy analysis, and research ethics.


Division of Computer Technology

CIT115 - Web Design

This course introduces students to the concepts and technologies used in development and maintenance of web sites. The class focuses on Web page planning, basic design, layout and construction. HTML/XHTML, Cascading Style Sheets, JavaScript/VBScript, DOM are taught in order to give students a good grounding in all aspects of creating state-of-the-art active content for the Web page. Various Web page and image creation tools are taught in the course. During the course of study students will publish their own Web Pages and Projects integrating practical experience with the theory.


CIT125 - Client Specific Relational Databases

This course introduces students to Microsoft Access, the use and development of tables, queries, the Access window, views, help and cue cards, as well as printing and importing. Additional topics include creating and customizing forms, advanced queries, relational theory, sorting, filters, main forms and sub forms, calculated fields in forms and reports, and producing reports. The functionality of DBMS vs. RDBMS is also discussed.


CIT170 - UNIX Operating System and Shell Programming

This course introduces students to UNIX/LINUX operating system concepts with emphasis on file/directory structures, external and internal file manipulation commands and UNIX/LINUX utilities. Instructional topics include the essential tasks of file system management, backup procedures, process control, user administration, and device and printer management. The course also covers shell programming in detail. Students will be able to write shell scripts (commands), to manage file system and execute programs.


CIS220 - Systems Analysis and Design

This course introduces students to effective methods of information planning, project management, and system implementation throughout the system's life cycle. Students will study the stages of system development including problem definition, consideration of alternative solutions, implementation, control, and management of the system. Computer-Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tools are used for modeling and project management.


MAT205 - Advanced Math for Computer Programmers

This course covers the mathematical topics most directly related to computer science. Topics include: logic, relations, combinatorics, mathematical induction, recursion, graph theory, discrete probability, and number theory. Emphasis will be placed on providing a context for the application of mathematics within computer science. Students will analyze algorithms, measure complexity, and simplify and optimize algorithms.


Division of Arts and Sciences

PHI200 - Introduction to Philosophy

This course surveys the canon of philosophical thought which presently defines the field. Students will explore the development of philosophy from a historically based collection of thinkers starting with Plato and working through to Sartre. All philosophy stems from fundamental questions. Throughout this course, the student will be examining basic assumptions, revising received views and looking in depth at the work of philosophers who at times took immense risks to do just this. By examining the original works of the philosophers themselves, students will explore first-hand the various modes of thought that brought civilization from Socratic rhetoric to the theories of Existentialism. This course seeks to define what we understand today to be philosophic inquiry.


ENG105 - English Composition I

This course in English Composition will introduce the student to various techniques of the writing process. Here, they will learn to explore voice, tone, analytical reading, critical thinking, literature and a great deal more. The main objective here will be to transfer thoughts onto paper and do this in a comfortable way, while finding individual authorial voices and styles. Students will use writing to discover, organize, and develop ideas; to express their personal thoughts; to collect and evaluate information; and to persuade their readers.


ENG205 - English Composition II

This module is the second component in the series of English Composition courses. Here, using Composition I as a springboard, the curriculum of this course is designed to foster within students of all disciplines of study, the ability to apply and expand the knowledge of the writing process. In doing so, students will learn to: (a) read and analyze literary works critically; (b) conduct research through various different modes including library, data-bases and Internet; (c) explore rhetorical strategies; (d) learn proper forms of documentation and citation of sources.


PSY105 - Introduction to Psychology

This course covers the major facts, theories, and controversies of contemporary psychology from a natural science perspective. Topics include Freud and psychoanalysis, genetics and behavior, neural bases of behavior, motivation, emotion, sensation, perception, intelligence, and mental disorders and their treatment.


SOC105 - Introduction to Sociology

This course introduces students to the study of human behavior in society. Students will examine major components of sociology, including culture, diversity, as well as such social institutions as family, government, and education. Students will be required to investigate and write about their own social values and to write critically about society in general


PHI110 - Introduction to Ethics

In this course, students will examine moral belief systems, including different theories of ethics and their application to moral issues in the society at large and in daily New York City life. Students will examine major ethical questions, including "What is morality?" and "What does God have to do with right and wrong?" Students will present ethical ideas ofphilosophers like Immanuel Kant and Jean-Paul Sartre to the class. Students will also be required to investigate and write about their own ethical values and to write critically about the application of ethics to life.


Division of Core Competency

CDV 100 - Career Development Seminar

This course provides the job and career management tools necessary for the student to reach his/her full career potential. The student will develop essential career success skills through class activities and direct practice in the business community. Hands-on assignments in each session will allow the student to research employers; learn about application requirements, practice meeting business people in various career fields, and practice successful interviewing techniques.